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Lee Ann Womack: Lee Ann Womack CD Track Listing

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Lee Ann Womack Lee Ann Womack (1997)
Originally Released May 13, 1997 \n\nAMG EXPERT REVIEW: Lee Ann Womack's eponymous debut showcases a promising country vocalist who is more comfortable with ballads and pop than down-home honky tonk. The slick, professional production helps make the album a pleasant listen, despite the fairly uneven songwriting, and Womack certainly has a voice that can make the mediocre sound appealing, which results in a winning debut. -- Thom Owens\n\nAmazon.com Editorial Review\nLee Ann Womack is a rarity in modern Nashville--an authentic honky-tonk debut album. Producer Mark Wright has refused to bury Womack's small-town, East Texas drawl under the Hollywood soft-rock cloaking that Music Row favors these days. As a result, the young singer's soprano projects an attitude too unsophisticated to hide any emotion. On the first single, "Never Again, Again," you can hear in quivering high notes the dilemma of a woman who keeps breaking her own promise to never take her ex-lover back. Not every song is that sharply focused, and the obligatory boot-scootin' dance numbers and string-smothered ballads dilute the album's impact. But you can hear Womack's potential when she assumes the persona of a hardened waitress explaining the facts of life to an ex-boyfriend in "Montgomery to Memphis." --Geoffrey Himes \n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nLee Ann's Debut, September 18, 2003\nReviewer: Jake Z "holden84" (Canada)\nThis album came out in the spring of 1997. Lee Ann's first single was "Never Again, Again", a midtempo country number about always taking a man back. Immediately buzz started about this artist, she was the most traditional thing to come around in a long time. Her big hit that put her on the map was the ballad "The Fool". There's some great songs on here, like "Montgomery to Memphis", "Buckaroo", "Man With 18 Wheels", etc. The duet with Mark Chesnutt "Make Memories With Me" is also a highlight. My favorite song is "You've Got To Talk To Me", which was a hit for her as well. This was her first album, and as her albums progressed they became a little more polished but she is talented nonetheless.\n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nWomack's Best Work, January 25, 2003\nReviewer: K. Gillies "kateling" (Port Huron, MI USA)\nThis CD is my favorite from Lee Ann Womack. The writing is superb and Lee Ann's vocals are stellar.\n\n"The Fool", the song that really put Lee Ann on the map is on here. The rest of this CD is really full of great songs though, like the upbeat "Buckaroo" about her dream cowboy; the Gospel wonder "Get Up in Jesus' Name"; the Zydeco-flavored "Trouble's Here" and "Never Again, Again", a great mid-tempo shuffle about always taking him back. My personal favorites are "You've Got to Talk to Me", an honest song about how women aren't mind readers and Leslie Satcher's "Man With 18 Wheels", an uptempo romp about her truckin' man.\n\nI Hope You Dance may be her biggest album, but this one showcases her deep country roots best.\n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nGrounded In Tradition, September 1, 2002\nReviewer: Chris S. "cscotts" (atlanta, ga United States)\nWhile pop was starting to take over Nashville back in 1997, Lee Ann Womack's self-titled debut ushered her onto the scene as the most traditional-sounding female vocalist the genre had seen since Patty Loveless debuted in the late '80s. In the middle of more pop-slanted vocalists like Reba and Martina, you had 'Never Again, Again' and everyone scratching their heads wondering "How the hell did that get on the radio, and more importantly, who's the singer?" Womack's debut beautifully straddled a fine line between modern('You've Got To Talk To Me') and traditional(the brilliant--and self-penned--'Am I The Only Thing You've Done Wrong'),and her Dolly Parton-meets-Alison Krauss soprano remains a thing of fragile purity even today. This set remains arguably the most significant debut by a female country artist of the last decade.\n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nContemporary country with strong traditional flavor, July 14, 2002\nReviewer: P D Harris "Pete the music and horse racing fan" (Leicester England)\nOne of the best country debut albums of recent years, Lee Ann has managed to sound contemporary and traditional at the same time. At heart, she would probably like to do a stone country album, but she knows that would kill her career. Lee Ann is much too smart to allow that to happen, so she records music that sounds contemporary without losing her roots, something not everybody can achieve.\nNever again again was her debut single, but it was her second, The fool, which really set Lee Ann on her way to stardom. There is a nice duet with Mark Chesnutt (Make memories with me), a rousing gospel song (Get up in Jesus name) and the danceable upbeat Buckaroo and Trouble's here. Other great tracks are Do you feel for me, Montgomery to Memphis and A man with 18 wheels. Actually, every track is brilliant.\n\nThis album didn't make Lee Ann into a megastar (that came via I hope you dance, her third album) but it is an outstanding album in it's own right.\n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nExcellent Debut Album!, December 4, 2001\nReviewer: J. M. Zuurbier (Canada)\nFrom the opening song of Lee Ann Womack's auspicious debut album, it's clear that this talented young woman is set on singing a slightly different song than is generally heard among Nashville's "new hats". "Never Again, Again" may be about the singer's lack of willpower to end a flawed relationship, but the Texas-born Womack seems to have little problem charting her own musical course. Womack's music recalls early-to-mid-sixties country music without losing any of the luster of today's current sound.\nIn "Buckaroo", a fast paced description of the kind of man she finds attractive, Womack sings: "Don't have to wow me like a long beard Shakespeare, Just talk plain talk right here in my ear, If you aspire to sophistication, I'll tell you now you're in the wrong location." In other words, what Womack is looking for is simplicity. With her debut album, Womack does more than just successfully achieve simplicity, she simply succeeds.\n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nvery nice-sounding cd, March 23, 1999\nReviewer: A music fan\nLee Ann Womack is by far my favorite female singer in country music. While I did not enjoy "Man With 18 Wheels" or "Buckaroo" very much (probably because I'm male), the rest of the songs are excellent examples of good traditional country music. "Am I The Only Thing That You've Done Wrong" and "Never Again, Again" have been two of my all-time favorite songs ever since I first heard them. I respect Lee Ann and her producer very much for not falling into the mainstream that seems to be turning country music into a nauseating spinoff of soft rock. Her ability to convey feelings through music reminds me of the great Hank Williams Sr., and she also tends to avoid those "generic love songs" that seem to dominate country music today.\n\nAMAZON.COM CUSTOMER REVIEW\nOne of Nashville's best projects. Thanks Lee Ann and Decca!, May 4, 1998\nReviewer: A music fan\nThis album will make you tap your toes to the upbeat tunes, then nearly cry through the sad ones. "18 Wheels" is FUN! "Never Again, Again" is a sample of classic, traditional country that is so exciting, yet oh-so-familiar, that you feel you've known Lee Ann Womack's work all your life. Listen to "Buckaroo" over-and-over again for a spirited romp through fantastic lyrics! If you enjoy the soulful strains of a true country artist unleashed on an album chock-full of first class songs, plan on keeping this album in your CD player permanently! Please, Lee Ann Womack and Decca, make more of these!\n\nHalf.com Details \nContributing artists: Mark Chesnutt, Ricky Skaggs \nProducer: Mark Wright \n\nAlbum Notes\nPersonnel: Lee Ann Womack, Mark Chesnutt (vocals); Carl Gorodetzky (conductor); Biff Watson, Pat Flynn (acoustic guitar); Brent Mason, Larry Byrom (electric guitar); Paul Franklin (steel guitar); Abraham Manuel Jr. (accordion); Gary Smith, Tony Brown (piano); Steve Nathan (piano, Wurlitzer, Hammond B-3 organ); Mike Brignardello (bass); Lonnie Wilson (drums); Tom Roady (percussion); Bergen White, Liana Manis, Lisa Silver, Ricky Skaggs, Sharon White Skaggs, Leslie Satcher, Gene Miller, Curtis Young, John Wesley Ryles (background vocals); Nashville String Machine.\n\nAll tracks have been digitally mastered using HDCD technology.\n\nFrom the opening song of Lee Ann Womack's auspicious debut album, it's clear that this talented young woman is set on singing a slightly different song than is generally heard among Nashville's "new hats". "Never Again, Again" may be about the singer's lack of willpower to end a flawed relationship, but the Texas-born Womack seems to have little problem charting her own musical course. Womack's music recalls early-to-mid-sixties country music without losing any of the luster of today's current sound.\nIn "Buckaroo", a fast paced description of the kind of man she finds attractive, Womack sings: "Don't have to wow me like a long beard Shakespeare, Just talk plain talk right here in my ear, If you aspire to sophistication, I'll tell you now you're in the wrong location." In other words, what Womack is looking for is simplicity. With her debut album, Womack does more than just successfully achieve simplicity, she simply succeeds.\n\nIndustry Reviews\n...has more heart than any other new female country singer, and a passel of traditional-sounding songs that may just be good enough to turn Nashville's commercial tide. Look out Rimes--there's another Lee Ann in town now. - Rating: A\nEntertainment Weekly (05/16/1997)\n\n...Womack can handle a trucker's song with genuine aplomb....Womack gets down and wrestles around in true human emotions...\nMusician (07/01/1997)
This country cd contains 11 tracks and runs 39min 43sec.
Freedb: 97094d0b

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  1. Lee Ann Womack - Never Again, Again (03:45)
  2. Lee Ann Womack - A Man With 18 Wheels (03:20)
  3. Lee Ann Womack - You've Got To Talk To Me (03:34)
  4. Lee Ann Womack - The Fool (03:32)
  5. Lee Ann Womack - Am I The Only Thing That You've Done Wrong (03:48)
  6. Lee Ann Womack - Buckaroo (03:00)
  7. Lee Ann Womack - Make Memories With Me / Lee Ann Womack with Mark Chesnutt (03:32)
  8. Lee Ann Womack - Trouble's Here (03:09)
  9. Lee Ann Womack - Do You Feel For Me (03:23)
  10. Lee Ann Womack - Montgomery To Memphis (04:42)
  11. Lee Ann Womack - Get Up In Jesus' Name (03:51)


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